How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


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How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


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How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


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How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


How to Beat the Heat

  ·  3 min

How to Beat the Heat

Summer is in full swing and the days of single digit weather are long gone. If you’re like me and live below the Mason-Dixon Line then you’re experiencing a lot of heat and humidity, and no wind or rain. That’s the gist of summer weather where I’m from. I know, not necessarily the ideal running conditions, right? Well, there’s not really much we can do about the weather, so we might as well deal with it. Here are seven tips that will help you stay active and on track with your running workouts throughout the summer.RISE AND SHINE. Yeah, yeah, we know. You’re not a morning person. You hate being up before the sun. Well, my guess is that you’re also not a heat stroke person, either. The best way to avoid the heat in the summer time is simple: get going before it does.STAY UP LATE. If you absolutely refuse to get up before the sun, then your best bet is to wait until it goes down. Although it is generally stick hot and muggy during the summer evenings, it beats having the sun beaming down on you. It will save you 10-15 degrees, and one huge headache.STAY HYDRATED. This could possibly be the most important of all, regardless of the time of year or time of day. Hydration is vital no matter when or where you are running. But, when we add severe temperatures into the mix, it becomes even more important. Drink plenty of water before, during (if possible), and after your run.RUN INDOORS. If you absolutely refuse to run early or late, then try taking it indoors. Trust me, I hate running on an indoor track as much as the next guy. Let’s be honest, they flat out suck. But, 70 degrees in the air conditioning is quite appealing when it feels like the surface of the sun outside.RUN SLOWER. If you insist on running outside, start off at a slower speed. There is nothing more detrimental when running in the heat than going out too fast. This will get your heart rate and body temperature elevated faster than you think. While this is certainly not uncommon, it is something you want to try and avoid as much as you can.RUN SHORTER. Allow yourself time to get acclimatized to the warmer weather. Instead of running 5 miles at high noon, opt for a 5k instead. Let your body, and mind, get used to the drastic change in temperature.SWAP YOUR HEADGEAR. During the winter months, I always wear a hat or beanie. This keeps all the warmth from my big ole’ head close to my body. In the summertime, you want to do just the opposite. Swap the hat out for a lightweight visor. It’s a good way to let off some extra body heat while still keeping the sun out of your eyes.There you have it folks. Next to sitting next to the air conditioner, these tips are your best bet for staying cool in the summer months. Do you have any ideas that have helped you while running outside? If so, leave them below in the comment section.Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


Going All In

  ·  3 min

Going All In

When training for an upcoming race or competition I try to follow one rule above all else. That rule is to always “leave a little something in the tank” at the end of my workouts.  This does not mean that I am not training hard for whatever is coming up, rather I am training smart.  I am very meticulous when it comes to designing my own training sessions, and most of them result in about 70-90 percent of my maximal effort.  I’ve found that this type of structure has not only made my training more effective, but my performance has improved as well.With that said, however, I’m not against working at maximal capacity.  These are what I like to call my “All In” workouts.  These are the workouts that you dread beforehand, and hurt for a few days after—you know what I’m talking about.  The purpose of this type of training is just as much mental as it is physical.  Yes, you are pushing your body to its limits and making different energy systems adapt to training.  But, more importantly, you’re training your mind to realize what you are physically capable of doing.Here are three of my favorite “All In” workouts:HILLSFind a hill that has a good incline, one that will take about 30-45 seconds to sprint to the top.  The workout is pretty simple.  Sprint to the top.  Jog back to the bottom.  Repeat as many times as you can, until you can no longer truly sprint up the hill.  Then do one more set!  Remember, this is an all-out sprint, no slacking.REPEATSI like to start with half-mile sprints here.  Run at your 5k pace or faster.  You’re only running half a mile, so crank the speed up.  Rest 2-3 minutes and then repeat, trying to match or better your time.  When you can no longer maintain this time, drop down to quarter-mile sprints.  Go through the same process – sprint, rest, repeat.  Keep going as long as you can maintain the same pace.  Once you cannot match your speed/time, your workout is done.SPEED DISTANCEThis one is the killer workout, one that can humble even the most seasoned runner.  The workout is simple.  Choose a distance that you would consider long for you.  Maybe it’s three miles, maybe it’s 10, I’ll leave that to you.  Here’s the catch: Each mile you run has to be faster than the previous mile.  By the time you reach your final mile – however many that may be – you should be running faster than you have throughout any of the workout.  Doing this will ensure that you have “emptied the tank” by the time you’re finished.  Thank me later for this one.Workouts like this definitely have their time and place.  I wouldn’t recommend doing these on a daily or even weekly basis.  For one, they’re mentally taxing.  Second, and probably more important for training purposes, your body needs some time to recover.  The physical demand – and sometime damage – placed on the body by these workouts warrants a day or two of rest.  With that said, their purpose, as mentioned, shouldn’t be underestimated.  Not only will they improve your physical condition, but your mental strength as well.  Give them a try, you won’t be disappointed!Do you have a favorite “All In” workout?  If so, share it with us in the comment section!Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


The Realities of Running

  ·  4 min

The Realities of Running

One of the only concrete things about running is the surface that you’re on. Some people are distance runners, while others prefer sprinting.  Treadmills are great for certain people, yet some of us prefer the outdoor run.  Everybody is unique in their own way.  With that being said, there are many things that can hold true for almost all runners, regardless of their situation.  Here are 6 of my “Realities of Running.”1. You Will Hate RunningI know what you’re thinking: This doesn’t really sound like something you should put in a post about running.  Well, the reality is that this is true, and almost all of you can relate to it.  There has been a time, at some point or another, when you have hated running.  Maybe burnout has set in, the weather has made for awful conditions, or you have simply had a streak of bad workouts.  Whatever the reason, there has been a point for all of us where we have despised the sport of running.2. You Will Love RunningThis one is more like it, right?  Just like we’ve hated it at times, the reason we keep going is because we ultimately love (or at least have an interest in) running.  Whether it’s the euphoric feeling you get after a hard run, the accomplishment of setting a new PR, or simply the ability to get lost in a long run, you’ve learned to love this sport.  It has become a part of you, almost to the point where you feel bad if you miss a day.  Know what I’m talking about?  Yeah, I thought so.3. Injuries Are InevitableThis is where the old “too much of a good thing” proverb comes into play.  There’s a solid chance that if you run long enough, something is going to start hurting at some point or another.  It could be something simple like a pair of aching knees or something more complicated like a muscle strain.  You could, of course, be one of those who can run 50 miles a week and be fine. But for most of us, the chance of something happening along the way is, unfortunately, fairly high.4. You Will Become CompetitiveDon’t get too excited here.  This isn’t competitive in the sense of winning races, getting endorsements, or making a ton of money.  The competitiveness I am talking about is with yourself and – if you have them – your peers.  It won’t take long, either.  Before you know it you will be trying to beat your fastest time or improve your longest run.  You’ll try to beat your running partner’s time in a certain distance.  Not only will this add a little excitement to your workouts, but it will force you to work harder and ultimately become a better runner.5. It Will Cost MoneyJust like anything else on this planet, if you want to enjoy running, you’re going to have to invest not just your time and effort, but your finances as well.  Just like you have to have the right equipment to do your job 40 hours a week, you have to have the right equipment if you want to get the most out of running.  Whether it’s a new pair of shoes, some cold weather gear, or the races that you want to cross off your list, you’re going to have to open up the checkbook.  Look at it like this:  You’re not simply paying to wear nice clothes or run a certain race, you’re buying an experience. You’re paying for something that is bigger than yourself, and something that those who don’t participate in won’t always understand.6. It Will Be Worth ItAfter all the pain and suffering, the time and financial input, the good races and bad, at the end of the day it is all worth it.  Running is something that, for almost all of us, is a part of us. To the point that if we don’t do it, we feel like something is missing.  The truth is, as I’ve mentioned, people who don’t run simply don’t understand what we get out of running.  Yeah, it’s not always great and we have bad days.  But, there’s always that good day right around the corner.  The day will come when you feel like you’re Forrest Gump and can “run clear to the ocean.”  The feelings of accomplishment and satisfaction are things that keep most of us coming back for more.Can you relate to any of these?  What are some of your “realities of running?” Post contributed by Brock Jones.  Brock is Co-Owner and Head Trainer with BodyFIT, Inc. in Lexington, KY. He holds a Masters of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of Kentucky and is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  You can read more of Brock’s posts about fitness and exercise on the BodyFIT Punch Blog.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

  ·  3 min

3 Tips To Help You Create a Kick A$$ Workout Playlist

We all know the power of creating the perfect workout playlist. It’s magic when it comes together, but creating that amazing blend can be quite the chore. Luckily, whether you’re rocking out at the club or the gym, my job is to use music to get your body moving, and I’ve discovered there are 3 key elements to make sure your workout music selection is kick ass, not a pain in the ass.Bounce along to the beatPay attention to beats per minute (BPM) and go for the high tempos! One of the main problems with listening to a random assortment of songs during exercise is the possibility of a ballad or slow tempo (low-BPM) song creeping into your workout playlist and demotivating you. So no matter how much you love Sam Smith, resist the urge to include him in your workout playlist. Especially during cardio, an energetic beat will keep you moving forward. What’s considered “energetic?” Pick something with a BPM (Beats Per Minute) of 150 or more and you’ll notice the difference!Tap into your emotionsWhile a good tempo plays a major role, sometimes you need to tap into your emotions to release your inner mojo. For this, lyrics are key. Whether it’s an 80s pop mix that helps you get lost in a run by reminiscing about high school or a perfectly placed song (think Eminem’s ‘Lose Yourself’) at the end of a tough run, emotional and motivational lyrics are important facets to work into your playlist.Go with the flowLastly, the flow of a playlist is imperative and should mimic what you are feeling at different moments (or states) during your workout. A solid format that I’ve found has three major parts. First, kick off with high-tempo tunes so your workout is positive and energetic from the very beginning! During the bulk of a playlist, stick with fun, familiar and steady tunes adding some sing along favorites to help you find that elusive “zone.” Towards the end of the mix try to pick up the energy again and also include songs with strong motivational lyrics. This will help you as you fatigue so that you finish strong. Ending with that feeling makes the next workout something you look forward to – not dread, and it’s all about the music!Bonus Tip!I’ll leave you with one final tip and that’s the free RockMyRun app for iPhone and Android. RockMyRun has taken the time to create kick ass workout mixes and playlists so that you don’t have to. Plus the music tempo can adjust to match your body’s movement or heart rate.So no matter what type of workout your preparing for, remember to bounce along to the beat, tap into your emotion and to go with the flow—it’s the perfect musical recipe for a successful workout!Post contributed by Dave Audé, an acclaimed music producer and DJ as well as creative consultant at RockMyRun. Audé has created over 100 No.1 Billboard tracks and has worked with Kelly Clarkson, Selena Gomez, One Republic, Coldplay and U2, among many other chart-topping artists.


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

  ·  2 min

How to Get Faster With RockMyRun

Do you ever feel stuck in a workout rut?A friend of mine used to tell me my running was like “dog food,” because I ran the same path at the same pace at the same time every day. I always looked forward to the run, but there was never any variation – it was like dog food.Now, there’s a lot to be said for consistency, but I have to admit that my friend (ok, now he’s my husband) had a great point. I would go on and on about how I wanted to run faster, but I wasn’t actually challenging myself ever to do it. I was content to coast.The thing is, speed workouts aren’t for me. This sounds a little lazy, but I don’t find them to be fun, and when it’s not fun, it’s not happening before dawn breaks.Flash forward about 10 years later to a time after our fearless founder, Adam, had created RockMyRun and pretty much banned dog food runs forever.Here’s how I used RockMyRun to life hack a faster running time (and you can too!)I realized that I tend to run at about a 160 cadence when I’m comfortably chugging alongI was about to do a post-work 5K and wanted to speed through it to meet some friends at the finish for a frosty beverageIt was a Hip Hop kind of evening, so I had already Favorited G Mode by DJ Dennis J. That’s when it hit me! Instead of having the music match my cadence as I ran, why not set it higher than my normal cadence and play a game of chase?For a person that’s not into speed workouts, this was a freaking rad way to make it happenAnd by it, I mean a big time PR. I smashed that 5K in 24 minutes flatThose steps againPick a station you love that is close (within 20 bpm of) your natural cadenceMake sure you save it to your Favorites for easy accessBefore you start running, use MANUAL to set the BPM 5-10 points higher than your cadenceDog food be gone!Rock On!


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